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Weekly Media Briefing October 2nd-8th

By Michael Hurtig
Monday, October 3rd, 2011
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NPR names Sesame Street Executive as its new Executive, says the New York Times.

Even though the drama of previous months has lessened, Google and the Association of American Publishers are still attempting to reach a settlement, guided by Judge Denny Chin.  Need to brush up on your knowledge of the Google Books settlement?  Here is an excellent piece from the New York Review of Books on what the stakes are.

E.W. Scripps company is expanding with the purchase of nine McGraw Hill TV stations.

Millions of young Russians are choosing the internet over television as a source of entertainment. Overwhelming declines in ratings and advertising revenues are forcing channels to reformat their programs with American dramas and reality shows.

Clear Channel, the country’s biggest radio station operator, has a new CEO. Robert Pittman will lead the company as it continues an effort to give its collection of 850 radio stations a strong presence online and maintain its position in the outdoor advertising market.

The St. Petersburg Times is now offering its political fact checking system, Politifact News Service, to newspaper publishers.

ABC News is partnering up with Yahoo to create an online news-programming model. Content from ABC News will be merged into Yahoo news, the Yahoo homepage, and more. According to Ben Sherwood, president of ABC News, the  new relationship “will give ABC News an unrivaled ability to reach across the Web, combining Yahoo’s vast distribution and cutting-edge technology with our award-winning journalism.” Via Los Angeles Times.

With 17 million visitors last month, Mashable is expanding its scope to include world news, among other new sections.

Youtube has strong original content deals on the horizon with everyone from media majors like News Corp. to celebrities and established executive producers. The Google-owned video streaming site isn’t waiting for the convergence of television sets and internet search to make its mark in entertainment.