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Nature (Season 32) – Leave it to Beavers
Air date: 05/14/2014

THIRTEEN’s Nature Debuts Leave it to Beavers Wednesday, May 14, 2014 on PBS

 

Nature’s greatest hydro-engineers transform landscapes

 

The beaver, more than any other animal, is responsible for creating fertile landscapes across North America, but it hasn’t gotten much recognition for that accomplishment until now. A growing number of scientists, conservationists and grass-roots environmentalists have come to regard beavers as overlooked tools in reversing the effects of global warming and world-wide water shortages. These industrious rodents are adept at controlling water and have been doing so for thousands of years.

Leave it to Beavers tells the story of beavers in North America – their history, their near extinction, and their current comeback as modern day eco-heroes. The program airs Wednesday, May 14 at 8 p.m. (ET) on PBS (check local listings). After the broadcast, the episode will be available for online streaming at pbs.org/nature.

Millions of beavers once dominated the landscapes of Europe, Asia and North America. But when it was discovered that their fur made fantastic felt hats they were trapped to near extinction for the sake of fashion. It wasn’t until hats fell out of style that the population could slowly begin to recover and re-establish itself.

Yet as beavers reclaimed their ancestral ponds, they found themselves at odds with the humans who had moved in and developed the land in their absence. They gained a reputation as pests, the source of flooded properties and ruined roads, and were trapped and hunted all over again in an attempt to stop the damage. But it was a war the beavers continued to win, until a “beaver whisperer” in Canada came up with a plan to manipulate where the beavers built. It’s a win-win solution he plans to share with others who fight a losing war with beavers.

Beavers are devoted to their work as dam builders and they are born equipped and ready for the job. Their continuously growing, self-sharpening incisors strengthened with iron are the perfect tools of the trade. Not only do they help beavers fell the hundreds of trees they need to dam a river, they also come in handy for meals because beavers are vegetarians that gnaw through bark to eat the sugary layer underneath.

Every beaver family works together to build their dams of stone, logs and mud.  They erect sturdy lodges with secret entrances and exits and excavate deep channels in ponds that help retain water in arid environments. And as they work, broad meadows, rich with silt, and new ponds are created.

By the 1990s, scientists began to notice and investigate the effects beavers were having on the landscape and to document the results. A dramatic example is what happened to Nevada’s Suzie Creek, transformed by beavers from a desert to a veritable garden supporting wildlife such as sandhill cranes and mule deer.

Leave it to Beavers introduces viewers to an animal rehab expert who teaches a rescued orphan beaver the skills he’ll need to survive in the wild, and to hairdresser Sherri Tippie, the top live trapper of the species in North America, who rescues unwanted beavers in the Denver suburbs and then places them with farmers and beaver enthusiasts who eagerly provide new homes for them. Whether displaced from their pond, now part of a new housing development, or singled out for gnawing on trees at a golf course, Tippie has relocated over 1,000 beavers to date and her chief priority remains to keep families together. According to Tippie, “We’re asking so much of these animals and we’re displacing them. They’ve moved into a place where they should be and we don’t want them there. So if we’re going to mess around with them then we need to treat them as well as possible and then put them at a place where they can live out their lives.”

Nature is a production of THIRTEEN Productions LLC for WNET.  For Nature, Fred Kaufman is executive producer. Leave it to Beavers is a production of Dam Builders Productions Inc. in association with THIRTEEN Productions LLC for WNET.

Nature pioneered a television genre that is now widely emulated in the broadcast industry.  Throughout its history, Nature has brought the natural world to millions of viewers.  The series has been consistently among the most-watched primetime series on public television.

Nature has won over 700 honors from the television industry, the international wildlife film communities and environmental organizations, including 11 Emmys and three Peabodys.  The series received two of wildlife film industry’s highest honors: the Christopher Parsons Outstanding Achievement Award given by the Wildscreen Festival and the Grand Teton Award given by the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival. Recently, the International Wildlife Film Festival honored Nature executive producer Fred Kaufman with its Lifetime Achievement Award for Media.

PBS.org/nature is the award-winning web companion to Nature, featuring streaming episodes, filmmaker interviews, teacher’s guides and more.

Support for this Nature program was made possible in part by the Arnhold Family in memory of Clarisse Arnhold, the Lillian Goldman Charitable Trust, the Filomen M. D’Agostino Foundation, by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and by the nation’s public television stations.

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About WNET

As New York’s flagship public media provider and the parent company of THIRTEEN and WLIW21 and operator of NJTV, WNET brings quality arts, education and public affairs programming to over 5 million viewers each week. WNET produces and presents such acclaimed PBS series as Nature, Great Performances, American Masters, PBS NewsHour Weekend, Charlie Rose and a range of documentaries, children’s programs, and local news and cultural offerings available on air and online. Pioneers in educational programming, WNET has created such groundbreaking series as Get the Math, Oh Noah! and Cyberchase and provides tools for educators that bring compelling content to life in the classroom and at home. WNET highlights the tri-state’s unique culture and diverse communities through NYC-ARTS, Reel 13, NJTV News with Mike Schneider and MetroFocus, the multi-platform news magazine focusing on the New York region. WNET is also a leader in connecting with viewers on emerging platforms, including the THIRTEEN Explore iPad App where users can stream PBS content for free.

 

About “Think Wednesday”

Leave it to Beavers is part of PBS’ new “Think Wednesday” programming lineup of television’s best science, nature and technology programming that includes the acclaimed series NATURE and NOVA, the highest-rated nature and science series on television, coupled with new special programming at 10 p.m.  Wednesday nights on PBS offer new perspectives on life in the universe and keep viewers both curious and wanting more.

 

 

Photos
For editorial use in North America only in conjunction with the direct publicity or promotion of NATURE. No other rights are granted. All rights reserved. Downloading this image constitutes agreement to these terms.
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Beaver among the lily pads/medium head shot. Ontario, Canada. Photo Credit: © Michael Runtz

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Beaver at work dragging large branch/closeup. Ontario, Canada. Photo Credit: © Michael Runtz

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Two beavers grooming by water’s edge with image reflection, medium/close. Ontario, Canada. Photo Credit: © Michael Runtz

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Close up shot features beaver head and hands nibbling twigs. Shot through foreground of long green reeds. Ontario, Canada. Photo Credit: © Michael Runtz

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Beaver standing/profile/medium wide. Ontario, Canada. Photo Credit: © Michael Runtz

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Beaver lodge with reflection. Ontario, Canada. Photo Credit: © Michael Runtz

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Sherri Tippie holding a beaver kit (a pup). East Beaver Creek, Colorado. Photo Credit: ©Ford McClave 2013

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Sherri Tippie kissing a beaver kit (a pup). East Beaver Creek, Colorado. Photo Credit: © Ford McClave 2013

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Sherri Tippie (smiling) holding a beaver kit (a pup). Elk Ranch, East Beaver Creek, Colorado. Photo Credit: © Ford McClave 2013